Winter Conifers

Submitted November 30, 2017 at 3:00 PM

By: Bryn Ramjoué, Red Butte Garden Director of Communications

For centuries greenery such as evergreen trees and plants have brightened homes during dark winter months as a symbol of hope and renewal. History and lore describe the use of conifers as decoration beginning in Germany during the middle ages, with wider use since the Victorian Era.

Christmas Tree Illustration

A group of mostly evergreen, cone-bearing trees and shrubs, there are 588 species of conifers, with interesting shapes, colors, heights, and textures that produce unique needle or scale-like leaves.

A few interesting notes about conifers: Conifers include the Pine family with at least 240 species from 11 genera including Spruce, Fir, Pine, Cedar, and Larch. Pines have leaves that are in round and occur in bundles of one-to-five needles. Spruce and Fir needles are not bundled, but single and each needle has hard, flat, or squared edges rather than rounded spike-like needles. Spruce cones hang from the branch downward. Young Fir cones sit on the branch and point upward.

Spruce Cones

Spruce Cones

Fir Cones

Fir Cones

Although most conifers are evergreen, Larches shed their leaves annually. The Siberian Larch is the most numerous and widest spread of all trees. Bristlecone Pine is one of the oldest trees in the world, aging thousands of years. Other types of conifers include the Cypress family with 141 species like the Giant Sequoia, the largest trees, the Coastal Redwood, known as the tallest tress, and the Juniper, of which Utah is home to the world’s oldest Rocky Mountain Juniper. This family of conifers have flat, scaly sprays rather than needle-like leaves. The Podocarp family has 156 species dominating the southern hemisphere with tropical varieties. Other taxa include Araucaria, Umbrella Pine, and Yew. As you can see, conifers are as interesting as they are varied.

The best-selling conifers as indoor winter décor are: Scotch Pine, Douglas Fir, Fraser Fir, Balsam Fir, and White Pine.

Fraser Fir

Fraser Fir

Where can you see a wide variety of conifer trees? At Red Butte Garden, Utah’s botanical garden and arboretum, located in the foothills near the University of Utah. Recognized by the American Conifer Society as a reference garden, Red Butte Garden has an extensive conifer collection highlighting six families, 22 genera, and accessions representing 230 different taxa. Winter is a great season to see these magnificent trees.

Atlas Cedar and Juniper Deer Topiary

Atlas Cedar and Juniper Deer Topiary

Notable conifers in the Garden are: the deer topiary at the entry to the Children’s Garden shaped from a Juniper, mature Bristlecone Pines line the path west of the Children’s Garden, a Larch demonstrating fall shedding and a Japanese Red Pine with two-toned needles can be found in the Rose Garden.

Japanese Red Pine

Japanese Red Pine (foreground) and Larch (orange colored foliage in background) trees

Bristlecone Pine

Bristlecone Pine

For more information about the Red Butte Conifer Collection, CLICK HERE










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