Classical Greek Theatre Festival

Sophocles’ ELECTRA

Saturday & Sunday, September 26 & 27

2015 CLASSICAL GREEK THEATRE FESTIVAL of WESTMINSTER COLLEGE presents Sophocles' "ELECTRA"

-Pre-show orientation lecture at 8:30AM / Performances begin at 9AM
-Adults $15 / Garden Members $10 / Child & Student $7
-Performances to be held in the Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre

Saturday morning, Sept 26 performance

Sunday morning, Sept 27 performance

Traditionally, Greek Theatre is performed at dawn so bring breakfast, a blanket, and enjoy your morning in the garden with this live theatre performance.

In September of 2015 The Classical Greek Theater Festival of Westminster College will mount and tour a new production of Sophocles’ tragic masterpiece ELECTRA.

Sophocles makes the figure of Electra the dynamic centre of his play. She dominates the action by both her physical presence (she is onstage well over 90% of its length) and by her heroic nature. She is central to the plot, which focuses on her faithfulness to Agamemnon and to the idea of revenge, despite persecution from Aegisthus and Clytemnestra; on her extreme reactions to to the false report of Orestes’ death; and on her final deliverance from misery through his triumph over her persecutors. Her speaking part is one of the longest in Greek tragedy, during which she expresses the heights and depths of emotion, from bitter hatred to most tender love, from the deepest sorrow to the most exalted joy. Like Antigone she is fiercely loyal to the dead, in her case to her dead father. She is outspoken in her condemnation of his murderers, steadfast in her longing for revenge, unflinching in the face of punishment and even under threat of death.

Top 12 Reasons to see Sophocles' ELECTRA
1. We all love stories about revenge - especially when revenge "is a dish best served cold."
2. It's about families - dysfunctional, irrational families. You should feel right at home.
3. Electra is one of the most challenging female roles in all of Greek tragedy.
4. Like all great drama, this play is filled with conflict - conflict between generations, genders and sisters.
5. We are all for justice, but justice is a slippery word in this play. What is justice?
6. The play discusses the regime values of the Greeks - the values that make a Greek a Greek.
7. It's about mothers and daughters, unusual for a Greek tragedy, which is usually about fathers and sons.
8. There are no car chase... there is however a description of a bang-up chariot race.
9. Greeks know how to grieve, and the play contains the sounds, gestures, discourse and music of pain and loss.
10. It's really funny... well kinda ... maybe not so much.
11. It has a very satisfying ending - here's to the underdog.
12. It's a very "Greek" production both visually with the set design and costumes, and orally with ancient Greek embedded in the modern translation.

Sophocles (c. 497 – 406 BC), was one of the three great tragedians of classical Athens, the other two being Aeschylus and Euripides.

http://www.westminstercollege.edu/greek_theatre/

Location: 
Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre
Cost: 
Adults $15 / Garden Members $10 / Child & Student $7

HOURS
Jan 2-Mar 31: 9 am-5 pm
Apr 1-30: 9 am-7:30pm
May 1-Aug 31: 9 am-9 pm*
Sept 1-30: 9 am-7:30 pm*
Oct 1-Dec 23: 9 am-5 pm

Closed Thanksgiving Day
and Dec 24-Jan 1

*Days when outdoor concerts are scheduled, hours are 9 am-5 pm.

Only Service Animals are allowed in the Garden

GENERAL ADMISSION

Members: Free
Adults (ages 18-64): $10
Seniors (ages 65+): $8
Military w/ID: $8
Children (ages 3-17): $6
Children (under 3): Free
U of U Faculty/Staff: $8
U of U Students: Free with valid ID

Groups (12 or more) $1 off ea. person

Enjoy half-price admission December, January, and February

CONTACT
(801)585-0556

LOCATION
300 Wakara Way
Salt Lake City, UT 84108
How to Get Here

XMission

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